Archives for posts with tag: nick thurston

massacre-streetOnce again, December brings an opportunity to reflect upon the year’s books. Like previous years, this “most engaging books” list is idiosyncratic and by no means reflects “the best”, only what i found most engaging and most rewarding … this is a  selection of what i considered the most fascinating / useful / generative books of the year. Seek out these volumes, every one will reward the search (and your local, independent, bookstore can help…). This is the cream of the crop for 2013:

Heimrad Bäcker. Seascape. Patrick Greaney, trans. (Brooklyn: Ugly Duckling Presse)

Jen Bervin and Marta Werner. The Gorgeous Nothings. (New York: New Directions).

Jaap Blonk klinkt. (Gent: het balanseer).

Craig Dworkin. No Medium. (Cambridge: MIT Press).

Kenneth Goldsmith. Seven American Deaths and Disasters. (Brooklyn: Powerhouse)

Jeet Heer. In Love with Art: Françoise Mouly’s Adventures in Comics with Art Spiegelman. (Toronto: Coach House).

bpNichol. A book of variations: love-zygal-art facts. Stephen Voyce, ed. (Toronto: Coach House).

Yoko Ono. Acorn. (New York: OR)

Rachel Simkover, ed. An Anthology of Concrete Poetry. (Berlin: Motto).

Nick Thurston. Of the Subcontract (York, UK / Toronto: information as material / Coach House)

Emmett Williams. Anthology of Concrete Poetry (New York: Primary Information)

Andrew Zawacki. Video Tape. (Denver: Counterpath)

Paul Zits. Massacre Street (Edmonton: University of Alberta Press)

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ch4 16 FLAT Reading Remove copyNo Press is proud to announce the publication of Kristen Mueller’s “Partially Removing the Remove of Literature”

 

Produced in a limited edition of 50 hand-bound copies.

 

Partially Removing the Remove of Literature is a reading of Nick Thurston’s book Reading the Remove of Literature, which is itself a reading of Maurice Blanchot’s book L’Espace littéraire (The Space of Literature). In Thurston’s appropriation, he has assiduously erased every page of Blanchot’s seminal work, while preserving his own marginalia, through a processual transposition of hand-writing into formal typography. In Mueller’s reading of Thurston, she has partially erased every page of his book, leaving only Thurston’s (extra-textual(?)) markings—the underlinings and arrows, parentheses and exclamation marks—intact. By layering these remains, chapter for chapter, she presents portraits of Thurston’s reading of Blanchot, collapsed and condensed, proffering the gift of theft.

 

Kristen Mueller is the author of Language to Cover a Page (Motto Books, 2014). A longer version of Partially Removing the Remove of Literature will be published by her small press, & So, in 2014. 

 

“Partially Removing the Remove of Literature” is now available for $5ea.

 

To order please email derek beaulieu