Archives for category: conceptual writing

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20 LINES by Matt Madden

Published in a limited edition of 40 copies (only 20 of which are for sale from the press), 20 LINES is available for $8.00 including domestic postage (+ $2 non-Canadian postage). To order please email derek beaulieu.

 

 

Madden has this to say about 20 LINES:

I recently finished a one-year drawing project called “20 Lines”

The initial inspiration was a prose book by the American Oulipo author Harry Mathews called 20 Lines a Day, which is a partial document of a period where he wrote 20 lines of prose every morning he was at his desk as a warm-up exercise. He was inspired by a quote by Stendhal to the effect of “20 lines a day, genius or not”. He took that notion literally in a somewhat wry way and I did the same kind of thing: well, 20 drawn lines, how is that so different from 20 lines of writing? (It’s faster for one thing, most of the time.)

I took it on once we moved to France because one of my goals here is to work on my drawing, which lags behind my writing and my structural/linguistic thinking about comics. My goal was to concentrate on the most basic elements of drawing–lines on a ground–to reflect on how lines fill space, how they fit together. Maybe not so much “reflect” as simply to put my drawing hand, my brain, and my eyes to work to see what would come out of it. How all that will translate back into my comics I don’t really know, but I see it as part of a process of taking more conscious control of my drawing both at a physical as well as conceptual level.

Matt Madden is a cartoonist who has taught at the School of Visual Arts and in workshops around the world. His work includes 99 Ways to Tell a Story: Exercises in Style (Penguin), a collection of his comics adaptation of Raymond Queneau’s Exercises in Style; a translation from the French of Aristophane’s The Zabîme Sisters (First Second); and Drawing Words & Writing Pictures and Mastering Comics, (First Second), a pair of comics textbooks written in collaboration with his wife, Jessica Abel. For six years the couple were also series editors for The Best American Comics from Houghton-Mifflin Harcourt. He is currently on an extended residency at La Maison des Auteurs in Angoulême, France.

pRoses From Trans-Siberian to Trans-Canadian

88_1ROMANESCOAs Calgary’s Poet Laureate, I’m happy as pie to host an evening of sound poetry and experimentation by Christian Bok and Ian Sampson!

Ian Sampson, briefly back in Calgary, is a PhD candidate at Brown University. He is currently working on a radical translation of Beowulf and is an amazing performer of jaw-dropping sound poetry and beatboxing. Damn.

Christian Bok is the author of Eunoia and Crystallography and a seriously scary manuscript-in-progress entitled “The Xenotext.” His sound poetry and performance is seriously atomic. Double Damn.

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(free admission, please buy a book)

August 22, 7pm

Pages Books on Kensington

1135 Kensington Rd NW

Calgary, Alberta

George Murray’s newpoetry.ca features my visual poem “Game of Life: A User’s Manual”:

derek-beaulieu

photoNo Press is proud to announce the publication of

Ulysses by Jacqueline Valencia.

Published in a limited edition of 50 copies (only 25 of which are for sale), Ulysses is available for $3.50 including domestic postage (+ $1 non-Canadian postage). To order please email derek beaulieu.

On Dec 9, 2013 Jacqueline Valencia started handwriting – with spontaneous illustrations – the entirety of James Joyce’s Ulysses. The results are posted daily on gettinginsidejamesjoyceshead.blogspot.ca. Gathering the first 4 pages of Valencia’s obsessive practice, this edition of Ulysses claims the manuscript as Valencia’s.

Toronto-based poet, writer, and film critic Jacqueline Valencia earned her Honours BA in English at the University of Toronto (Literature major, Cinema Studies minor). Jacqueline is currently a freelancer, Assistant Editor at Beyond Borderlands, founding editor of These Girls On Film, and a film journalist and senior staff film critic at Next Projection.

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Daisy Knell by Ken Hunt

Published in a limited edition of 40 copies (only 20 of which are for sale), Daisy Knell is available for $2.00 including domestic postage (+ $1 non-Canadian postage). To order please email derek beaulieu.

This poem isolates letters from page 98 of NASA’s voice transcription of the Apollo 11 moon mission, uncovering (in sequential order) the musical notes of two chorus lines from Harry Dacre’s “Daisy Bell” (“A Bicycle Built for Two”). These chorus lines famously appear as the death knell of the computer HAL in Arthur C. Clarke and Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey.

Ken Hunt is the author of Space Administration (89+/LUMA Foundation, 2014). For three years, Ken served as editor of NōD Magazine, the University of Calgary English department’s publication of undergraduate prose, poetry, and visual art. In 2010, Ken co-founded The Scribe and Muse, a University of Calgary club that promotes writing and literacy, offering a free peer-editing service to students across all faculties. Ken lives in Calgary.

Speechless magazine – the journal of concrete poetry i edited and published from 2009 (and is now readily available on UBUweb as downloadable PDFs) was recently re-issued in a pirated edition by Kristen Mueller as poet-in-residence at the LUMA foundation in Zurich. I’m thrilled to hear that my work is being pirated and bootlegged, what could be cooler than that?

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9301-5No Press is proud to announce the publication of

Documentary Poetry by Heimrad Bäcker

with “Afterword: A Past Charged with Now-Time” by Sabine Zelger

In a Bilingual edition, translated by Jacquelyn Deal and Patrick Greaney.

Published in a hand-bound edition of 80 copies (only 40 of which are for sale), Documentary Poetry is available for $12+postage ($15 total). To order please email derek beaulieu.

“Documentary literature cuts through the skeins of imagination, paralyzes the literary impulses of the will, makes secondary reflection into an unnecessary addition, and negates remembrance ceremonies’ formulaic horror; documentary literature suffers no reduction in efficacy by repeated usage, makes visible that which is hidden by public and private mediocrity and its schematizing tendencies.”

Documentary Poetry presents the principles that guided Bäcker’s writing practice. It is one of the longest texts in poetics that he published during his lifetime.

Heimrad Bäcker (1925–2003) was an artist, poet, and influential editor of the Austrian avant-garde. He is the author of seven volumes of poetry, including transcript (Dalkey Archive Press, 2010) and Seascape (Ugly Duckling Presse, 2013). He published major works by Austrian artists and experimental writers in his journal neue texte (1968–1991) and under the imprint of Edition Neue Texte (1976–1992), the publishing house that he ran along with his wife Margret Bäcker. Most of his literary works draw on the methods of concrete and visual poetry to present documentary material about the Shoah. These books were historical and literary, and they were also part of a critical autobiography, an examination of Bäcker’s enthusiastic participation in the Hitler Youth and the Nazi Party.

Heimrad Bäcker’s “Dokumentarische Dichtung” was first published in the Vienna literary journal Protokolle, 29.2 (1992). This reprint and translation have been authorized by Thomas Eder, Bäcker’s literary executor. The translation was supported by a grant from the Austrian Federal Ministry for Education, Art, and Culture.

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ch4 16 FLAT Reading Remove copyNo Press is proud to announce the publication of Kristen Mueller’s “Partially Removing the Remove of Literature”

 

Produced in a limited edition of 50 hand-bound copies.

 

Partially Removing the Remove of Literature is a reading of Nick Thurston’s book Reading the Remove of Literature, which is itself a reading of Maurice Blanchot’s book L’Espace littéraire (The Space of Literature). In Thurston’s appropriation, he has assiduously erased every page of Blanchot’s seminal work, while preserving his own marginalia, through a processual transposition of hand-writing into formal typography. In Mueller’s reading of Thurston, she has partially erased every page of his book, leaving only Thurston’s (extra-textual(?)) markings—the underlinings and arrows, parentheses and exclamation marks—intact. By layering these remains, chapter for chapter, she presents portraits of Thurston’s reading of Blanchot, collapsed and condensed, proffering the gift of theft.

 

Kristen Mueller is the author of Language to Cover a Page (Motto Books, 2014). A longer version of Partially Removing the Remove of Literature will be published by her small press, & So, in 2014. 

 

“Partially Removing the Remove of Literature” is now available for $5ea.

 

To order please email derek beaulieu

 

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