Archives for posts with tag: conceptual writing

How Read - gallery view How Read - gallery view How Read - Flatland How Read - Flatland How Read - The Newspaper How Read - The Newspaper How Read - Local ColourHow Read - Niagara Arts Centre How Read - Untitled How Read - The Alphabet

New Orleans’ József Makkos is publishing a new small press edition of excerpts from my conceptual novel Flatland.

The edition will be a tactile treat and will feature letterpress covers printed on 50-year-old laid Strathmore bond (a type of which hasn’t been made for 20 years), off-white felt finis flyleaves and interior pages on english bond …

a few preview photos of the prototype for this forthcoming edition:

flatland 2 flatland 1

 

 

The kind folks at in edit mode press have sent some photographs of some of the pieces in the new edition of Local Colour : Ghosts, variations

Pre-order your copy now at a discount : €50.

bild4 bild2 bild1edition

front coverSeen of the Crime: essays on conceptual writing [PDF] is now online through ubuweb (and thank you so much to Snare Books for the original edition):

I am thrilled to announce that I am the guest blogger for Denver’s Museum of Contemporary Art in conjunction with their exhibition Postscript: Writing after Conceptual Art. My first post, on Fiona Banner’s 1066, is now live…

Local Colour : Ghosts, variations

(Malmö: In Edit Mode Press, 2012)
ISBN: 978-91-977853-4-1
First edition: 200 copies
Release date: December 17, 2012
Retail price: €65

Pre-order your copy now at a discount : €50.

LOCAL COLOUR : Ghosts, variations is a collaboration between In Edit Mode Press and Canadian poet Derek Beaulieu. The publication takes as its point of departure, Paul Auster’s novella Ghosts, and, in particular, Derek Beaulieu’s reworking of Auster’s text, Local Colour, which he describes as follows:

‘Local Colour’ is a page-by-page interpretation of Paul Auster’s 72-page novella ‘Ghosts’. ‘Ghosts’ concerns itself with Blue, a private detective hired by a mysterious character named White to transcribe the actions of Black, a denizen of Brooklyn Heights living on Orange Street. As Blue reports his findings, the reader becomes more aware of the intricate relationship between Black and White, and a tactile awareness of the role of colour spreads through the narrative. With ‘Local Colour’, I have removed the entirety of Auster’s text, leaving only chromatic words—proper nouns or not—spread across the page as dollops of paint on a palette. Taking inspiration from Kenneth Goldsmith’s Gertrude Stein on Punctuation (Abaton Books, 2000) what remains is the written equivalent of ambient music—words which are meant to be seen but not read. The colours, through repetition, build a suspense and crescendo which is loosened from traditional narrative into a more pointillist construction.

Focusing on the tension created in Beaulieu’s manuscript – and alluded to in the description of his process – between the textual narrative and the relatively abstract graphical mark, and the opening it seems to provide towards a sonic realm, we are now hoping to solicit a series of textual, aural, oral, musical, and other interpretations, as well as more machinic ‘utilisations’, of Beaulieu’s manuscript. What interests us, in particular, is the way in which Local Colour seems to split Auster’s narrative text open, deterritorialising it, serially, by rendering it purely graphical, freeing it up, in the same gesture, to an excess and a bifurcation of meaning. Seeking to extend and amplify this ambition, we are now opening the project up for others – writers, poets, musicians, artists – to split Beualieu’s manuscript open, to deterritorialise the coloured rectangles of his manuscript by textual, aural, narrative, graphical and other means.

Local Colour: Ghosts, variations collects and counterposes a wide array of strategies and approaches. It features both textual and aural contributions and contributions that combine text and sound. We hope it will prove an ambitious, vigorous collection that oscillates and moves between textual narrative, graphical mark, and aural impression, exploring these different realms whilst rendering uncertain any easy distinction between them.

CONTENTS (IN PRINT) :

Derek Beaulieu, Local Colour (printed book)
Steve Giasson, Couleur Locale (printed book)
Cia Rinne, Securiousity  (printed booklet)
Peder Alexis Olsson, Title TBA (print)
Jörgen Gassilewski, After Image (print)
Craig Dworkin, Unseen Colour (print)
Elisabeth Tonnard, Monochromatic Bits (print)
Martin Glaz Serup, Title TBA (printed book)
Eric Zboya, Untitled # 1 & 2 (Local Colour) (prints)
Ola Ståhl, Colour’s Gravity (printed book and prints)
Magda Tyzlik-Carver & Andy Prior, Ghost Machine (printed booklet)

CONTENTS (ON CD) :

Pär Thörn, Sound Interpretation of Derek Beaulieu’s ‘Local Colour’(sound piece)
Cecilie Bjørgås Jordheim, First of all there is Blue, Brown and I got ham, White and Blue (this section includes education) (sound pieces)
Ola Lindefelt, Title TBA (sound piece)
Andreas Kurtsson, Voice Range, Dialect Genre (sound piece)
Helen White, Local Ghosts (sound piece)
Ola Ståhl, Colour’s Gravity (recorded speech)
Gary Barwin, Local Colour (sound piece)
Ola Ståhl & Carl Lindh, Music Box (sound piece)
Magda Tyzlik-Carver & Andy Prior, Ghost Machine (software and videos)

October 12, 2012–February 3, 2013

Postscript: Writing After Conceptual Art features the work of over fifty artists and writers exploring the artistic possibilities of language. Presenting works from the 1960s to the present, the exhibition includes paintings, sculpture, installation, video and works on paper that raise questions about how we read, look at, hear, and process language today. A major current underlying the exhibition argues that the field of literature known as “conceptual writing” can be seen as engaging in a provocative dialogue with the field of contemporary art, producing new insights into the meaning of both literature and art. Co-curated by Nora Burnett Abrams and Andrea Andersson, Postscript is the first exhibition to examine the work of conceptual writing, investigating the roots of the movement in the art of the 1960s and 70s and presenting contemporary examples of text-based art practices.

Artists and writers featured in the exhibition include: Mark Amerika & Chad Mossholder, Carl Andre, Fiona Banner, Erica Baum, Derek Beaulieu, Caroline Bergvall, Jen Bervin, Jimbo Blachly & Lytle Shaw, Christian Bök, Marcel Broodthaers, Pavel Buchler, Luis Camnitzer, Ricardo Cuevas, Tim Davis & Robert Fitterman, Monica de la Torre, Craig Dworkin, Tim Etchells, Ryan Gander, Michelle Gay, Kenneth Goldsmith, Dan Graham, Alexandra Grant, James Hoff, Seth Kim-Cohen, Sol LeWitt, Glenn Ligon, Tan Lin, Gareth Long, Michael Maranda, Helen Mirra, Jonathan Monk, Simon Morris, João Onofre, Michalis Pichler, Paolo Piscitelli, Vanessa Place, Kristina Lee Podesva, Seth Price, Kay Rosen, Joe Scanlan, Dexter Sinister, Frances Stark, Joel Swanson, Nick Thurston, Triple Canopy, Andy Warhol, Darren Wershler, and Eric Zboya.

new from SNARE BOOKS:

Seen of the Crime: Essays on Conceptual Writing

by derek beaulieu

‘Finally, a book about poetry that is actually about poetry. derek beaulieu is quickly proving himself an essential companion to the contemporary.’~ Sina Queyras

In a series of statements, essays, missives, and informal discussions, seen of the crime surveys the radical edges of Canadian and international poetry; the conceptual and the concrete, the political and the playful. With seen of the crime, derek beaulieu explores the flourishing and frustrating alternatives: poetry without subjectivity, without narrative, without words, and even without letters.

Now available at independent bookstores near you.

The Calgary Herald takes an interest in my work in a piece entitled “alt.poet: Derek Beaulieu thinks outside the linguistic box

Four videos of my performance May 29, 2011 in Calgary’s Riley Park as part of the filling Station / Pooka Press Pub Crawl (as recorded by Helen Hajnoczky):

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 101 other followers