Archives for category: concrete / visual poetry

T E X T ual A R T i1948091_636690513079598_462224199_nvity: a month-long display of visual poetry
Official Opening / Reception / poetry reading / open mike
Tuesday, April 1, 2014 7:30 p.m.
The Human Bean,King Street, downtown Cobourg, ON.

Featuring visual poetry by Angela Rawlings, Derek Beaulieu, Camille Martin, Bill Bissett, Helen Hajnoczky, Robert Zend, Lindsay Cahill, Mark Laliberte, Jenny Sampirisi, Eric Schmaltz, Angela Szczepaniak, Gregory Betts & Neil Hennessy, Pearl Pirie, Eric Winter, Jessica Smith, Ted Amsden, Sharon Harris, Cliff Bell-Smith, Mary McKenzie, Wally Keeler, Katriona Dean, Gary Barwin, Judith Copithorne, michael j. casteels,
Alixandra Bamford, Em Lawrence and Dan Waber

Final emblem catalogue image Final emblem catalogue image spineShandy Hall has just released the sumptuous catalogue for their 2011 exhibition “The Emblem of my Work” designed to celebrate the 250th anniversary of Sterne’s marbled page, which Sterne described as ‘the motly emblem of my work’, 169 artists and writers were invited to design the Emblem of their own work.

Finally, this box of delights has been concocted where the identity of each Emblem-maker can be discovered in the booklet provided.  The catalogue is limited to 225 copies of which only 55 are available (170 copies are reserved for the participating artists and writers).
If you would like to reserve a copy, please contact the Curator at Shandy Hall.
The catalogue has been produced for the Laurence Sterne Trust by Colin Sackett.
Each contains an original, miniature marbled page by Payhembury Marbled Papers.

I’m proud to be included in this catalogue alongside such luminary colleagues as Tom Phillips, John Baldessari, Jen Bervin, Christian Bok, Helen Hajnoczky, Eric Zboya, Lemony Snicket and Eugen Gomringer…

ch4 16 FLAT Reading Remove copyNo Press is proud to announce the publication of Kristen Mueller’s “Partially Removing the Remove of Literature”

 

Produced in a limited edition of 50 hand-bound copies.

 

Partially Removing the Remove of Literature is a reading of Nick Thurston’s book Reading the Remove of Literature, which is itself a reading of Maurice Blanchot’s book L’Espace littéraire (The Space of Literature). In Thurston’s appropriation, he has assiduously erased every page of Blanchot’s seminal work, while preserving his own marginalia, through a processual transposition of hand-writing into formal typography. In Mueller’s reading of Thurston, she has partially erased every page of his book, leaving only Thurston’s (extra-textual(?)) markings—the underlinings and arrows, parentheses and exclamation marks—intact. By layering these remains, chapter for chapter, she presents portraits of Thurston’s reading of Blanchot, collapsed and condensed, proffering the gift of theft.

 

Kristen Mueller is the author of Language to Cover a Page (Motto Books, 2014). A longer version of Partially Removing the Remove of Literature will be published by her small press, & So, in 2014. 

 

“Partially Removing the Remove of Literature” is now available for $5ea.

 

To order please email derek beaulieu

 

photoNo Press is proud to announce the publication of Kate Briggs’s “On reading as an alternation of flights and perchings.”

Produced in a limited edition of 50 hand-bound copies.

Kate Briggs teaches the translation workshop component of the Master’s in Cultural Translation at The American University of Paris. She also teaches creative writing at Paris College of Art and in 2013-14 will be guest tutor at Piet Zwart Institute, Rotterdam. She is co-editor of The Nabokov Paper (Information as Material, 2013)

“On reading as an alternation of flights and perchings.” is now available for $3ea.

To order please email derek beaulieu

The November 2013 issue of Alberta Views features a review of Please, No More Poetry: the poetry of derek beaulieu:please no more poetry review

antonovskyNo Press is proud to announce the publication of a rare opportunity to gain insight in to the range of visual poetry produced in Ukraine. rarely seen in North America, these authors seek dialogue with contemporary international practice while responding to the tradition of visual poetry in Eastern Europe.

TWO FROM UKRAINE a collection of visual poems by Andrí Antonovsky and Volodymyr Bilyk

Each copy of TWO FROM UKRAINE includes:

Scobes by Volodymyr Bilyk (a 16-page visual poetry suite in a hand-stitched edition)

робота така робота by Andrí Antonovsky (a 16-page full-colour collection of Antonovsky’s visual poetry collages in a hand-stitched edition)

bilykComadots by Volodymyr Bilyk (a 4-page visual poetry suite pamphlet)

all of which are gathered in a rubber-stamped envelope and published in a strictly limited edition of 60 copies.

TWO FROM UKRAINE is now available for $12ea.

To order please email derek beaulieu

pattern-05No Press is proud to announce the publication of Braydon Beaulieu’s FLIGHT PATTERNS.

Produced in a limited edition of 60 hand-bound copies.

Through simple iconography, Flight Patterns maps Beaulieu’s reading patterns while reading Batwoman: Elegy – a visual poetry exploration of reading patterns and panel-ology wher action is suveyed by teh barest of lines and graphic gestures.

FLIGHT PATTERNS is now available for $4ea.

To order please email derek beaulieu

vp_header11UbuWeb’s Visual Poetry section has just been updated with over 80 new texts including exceedingly rare editions of d.a.levy’s magazines The Buddhist Thirdclass Junkmail Oracle and The Marrahwanna Quarterly and Ed Sander’s Fuck You: A Magazine of the Arts. Complementing these magazines are PDFs of scarce editions by Canadian visual poets David UU, John Riddell and bpNichol; Americans Johanna Drucker and Rosmarie Waldrop and International practicioners such as Max Ernst, Marcel Broodthaers and Bob Cobbing. This update focuses on small press magazines and highlights rarely-seen radical work in collage, overprinting and machine-based visual poetry.

UbuWeb began as an online repository for concrete and visual poetry scanned from aging anthologies and re-imagined as back-lit transmissions from a potential future. As the archive has progressed, the concentration on visual poetry has waned in favour of an reconnoitering of diverse avant-gardes. UbuWeb’s Visual Poetry section exposes little-seen exemplars of historical praxis and models of contemporary insight to a wider audience. This section includes anthologies, ephemeral publications, criticism and sporadic journals dedicated to visual poetry. Due to the elusive and ephemeral nature of concrete and visual poetry publications, there is a perceived lack of innovation in the genre. Without exposure to radical practice, artistic precedent and innovative models, concrete poets too often fall back upon familiar tropes and unchallenging forms. UbuWeb’s Visual Poetry section is not presented under the rubric of historical coverage or indexical completeness, but rather as a document of isolate moments of what Haroldo de Campos argued was a “notion of literature not as craftsmanship but [...] as an industrial prcoess” where the poem is a “prototype” rather than the “typical handiwork of artistic artistry.” — derek beaulieu

db_textportraitCalgary’s FFWD magazine has interviewed me about Please, No More Poetry and the changing face of poetics

beaulieu-emersonCounterpath is seeking performance, film, sound, writing, and
visual work that directly responds to or reads Writing Surfaces: The
Selected Fiction of John Riddell (2012, Wilfrid Laurier University
Press).
John Riddell’s work embraces game play, unreadability and
illegibility, procedural work, non-representational narrative,
photocopy degeneration, collage, handwritten texts, and gestural
work. His self-aware and meta-textual short fiction challenges the
limits of machine-based composition and his reception as a
media-based poet.
Riddell is best known for “H” and “Pope Leo, El ELoPE,” a pair of
graphic fictions written in collaboration with, or dedicated to,
bpNichol, but his work moves well beyond comic strips into a
series of radical fictions. In Writing Surfaces, derek beaulieu and
Lori Emerson present “Pope Leo, El ELoPE” and many other works
in a collection that showcases Riddell’s remarkable mix of largely
typewriter-based concrete poetry mixed with fiction and drawings.
Riddell’s oeuvre fell out of popular attention, but it has recently
garnered interest among poets and critics engaged in media studies
(especially studies of the typewriter) and experimental writing. As
media studies increasingly turns to “media archaeology” and the
reading and study of antiquated, analogue-based modes of
composition (typified by the photocopier and the fax machine as
well as the typewriter), Riddell is a perfect candidate for renewed
appreciation and study by new generations of readers, authors, and
scholars.
Counterpath will host an evening of approximately 5 performances of 10-15 minutes each on
December 14, 2013, at 7 p.m.

Please send a proposal of not more than 250 words to Counterpath
program coordinator Oren Silverman (os@counterpathpress.org) by October 31, 2013.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 78 other followers